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April 30, 2014

Japan's New Security Policy and Capabilities

Domestic Politics, International Views and Practical Implications

Wednesday, April 30th, 2014
JW Marriott Hotel, 1331 Pennsylvania Avenue NW
Washington, DC 20004

Sasakawa Peace Foundation USA
and
Admiral Dennis Blair
Former Director of National Intelligence and
Commander of US Pacific Command

invite you to attend a full-day forum
analyzing security developments in Japan, effects on the US-Japan Alliance
and implications for the region and beyond.

Register


9:00

Welcome

  • Junko Chano, President, SPFUSA

9:05

New Elements in Japan's Security Policy and Capabilities: NSS, NSC, NPDG and Collective Self-Defense

  • Satoshi Morimoto, former Minister of Defense
  • Noboru Yamaguchi, National Defense Academy of Japan
  • Moderator: Richard Samuels, Ford International Professor of Political Science, MIT

10:15

The New U.S.-Japan Security Partnership

  • Danny Russel, Assistant Secretary of State for East Asian and Pacific Affairs
  • Mark Lippert, Chief of Staff, Secretary of Defense
  • Moderator: Sheila Smith, CFR

11:15

Break

11:30

Regional Views of Japan's New Security Posture

  • Cui Tiankai, Chinese Ambassador to the United States (invited)
  • Kim Beazley, Australian Ambassador to the United States
  • Moderator: Ken Lieberthal, Brookings

12:30

Lunch

1:00

Keynote Address: Operational Impacts of Japan's New Security Policy and Capabilities on the U.S.-Japan Alliance

  • Dennis Blair, Incoming Chairman, SPFUSA
  • Moderator: Susan Glasser, Politico
  • Introduction: Junko Chano, SPFUSA

1:45

Break

2:00

Assessing Japan's New Security Policy and Capabilities

  • Patrick Cronin, CNAS
  • Abe Denmark, NBR
  • Mike Green, CSIS
  • Michael Schiffer, Senate Foreign Relations Committee
  • Moderator: Fred Hiatt, Washington Post

3:00

Afternoon Keynote: Managing Contingencies in a New Era

  • Shigeru Ishiba, Secretary General, Liberal Democratic Party
  • Moderator: David Sanger, New York Times

4:00

Adjourn

March 12, 2014

Japan's Foreign and Economic Policies

The Hon. Seiji Maehara's Assessment of the Abe Administration

co-presented by the Sasakawa Peace Foundation USA and the Center for American Progress


Please join The Sasakawa Peace Foundation USA and the Center for American Progress for remarks and discussion by the Honorable Seiji Maehara. Seiji Maehara has been a member of the House of Representatives of Japan since 1993. He was the leader of the Democratic Party of Japan from 2005 to 2006 and later served as Minister of Foreign Affairs and as Minister of Land, Transportation and Infrastructure under the cabinets of Naoto Kan and Yukio Hatoyama. Mr. Maehara will focus his remarks on Japan's relationship with Korea and China, U.S.-Japan security cooperation, and Abenomics.

Welcoming remarks:
Rudy deLeon, Senior Vice President, National Security and International Policy, Center for American Progress
Daniel Bob, Senior Fellow and Senior Director for U.S.-Japan Programs, SPFUSA

Introduction:
Glen Fukushima, Senior Fellow, Center for American Progress

Keynote remarks:
Honorable Seiji Maehara, Member of the House of Representatives of Japan

Location:
Center for American Progress
1333 H St. NW, 10th Floor, Washington, DC20005



Click here for more event materials

March 28, 2014

The Sasakawa Peace Foundation USA is pleased to invite you to an off-the-record discussion:

Structural Reform in Japan: The Path Ahead

Featuring:

Motoshige Itoh

Professor of Economics, University of Tokyo
President, National Institute for Research Advancement

Moderator:

Daniel Bob
Senior Fellow and Director, U.S.-Japan Programs, SPFUSA



Friday, March 28, 2014
12:00 PM . 1:30 PM
Sasakawa Peace Foundation USA
Suite 300, 1819 L St., N.W., Washington, D.C.

Motoshige Itoh is Professor of International Economics at the University of Tokyo and President of NIRA, a think tank in Tokyo. He is a member of the Cabinet Office's Council on Fiscal and Economic Policy and previously worked in a number of positions advising Japanese Prime Ministers and Cabinet Ministers. He is the author of more than 40 books on a variety of policy issues, writes regularly for several newspapers and magazines and has been published in such international journals as the Journal of Political Economy, Quarterly Journal of Economics, Review of Economic Studies and Journal of Economic Theory. He holds degrees from the University of Tokyo and the University of Rochester.

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January 13, 2014

U.S. - Japan Commission on the Future of the Alliance

Co-presented by the Sasakawa Peace Foundation USA,
Sasakawa Peace Foundation of Japan
and the Center for Strategic and International Studies


Commission Members

  • Richard Armitage, Armitage International L.C.; CSIS Trustee
  • Aaron Friedberg, Princeton University
  • Michael Green, CSIS and Associate Professor, Georgetown University
  • Jiro Hanyu, Sasakawa Peace Foundation
  • John Hamre, CSIS
  • Ryozo Kato, Former Ambassador of Japan to the United States
  • Joseph Nye Jr., John F. Kennedy School of Government, Harvard University; CSIS Trustee
  • Yukio Okamoto, Okamoto Associates
  • Ryouichi Oriki, Former Chief of Staff, Joint Staff
  • Masashi Nishihara, Research Institute for Peace and Security
  • Koji Tanami, Former Administrative Vice Minister, Ministry of Finance and former President, Japan Bank for International Cooperation

    Monday, January 13, 2014
    CSIS Center for Strategic and International Studies
    1616 Rhode Island Avenue, NW
    Washington, DC 20036

    The Sasakawa Peace Foundation USA, Sasakawa Peace Foundation of Japan and the Center for Strategic and International Studies held the second joint meeting of the U.S.-Japan Commission on the Future of the Alliance on January 13, 2014. The Commission issued the following statement based on its discussions.

    The Asia Pacific region is the center of dynamism in the international system, and events there are defining the security and prosperity of the world. Increased economic interdependence and a budding institutional architecture create a solid foundation for a vibrant and stable future, but the region also faces an array of challenges that could destabilize the security environment. For over six decades the U.S.-Japan alliance has been the cornerstone of security and stability in the Asia Pacific, and it should continue to play an important role in shaping the regional order.

    The U.S. and Japanese governments are taking important steps to strengthen the alliance and ensure that it remains a lynchpin in maintaining regional stability and prosperity. In 2013 the Sasakawa Peace Foundation and the Center for Strategic and International Studies (CSIS) established a bilateral commission of distinguished policymakers and scholars to develop a strategic vision for the alliance. The commission met for the second time on January 13 in Washington after an inaugural meeting last June in Tokyo and will continue over the next two years to discuss a range of issues animating the bilateral relationship.

    At this second meeting the commission examined several issues including the rise of China and the role of the alliance in maintaining stability in the Asia Pacific, as well as overcoming complexities in relationships among nations in the region. Commissioners discussed China's recent moves, including declaration of an Air Defense Identification Zone (ADIZ) and the recent announcement of extended fisheries zones in the South China Sea in the context of Beijing's overall capabilities and intentions, and agreed on the importance of ensuring a sustained commitment to shared principles such as freedom of navigation in the East and South China Seas. They also reviewed the security strategies of Japan and the United States. The Japanese side explained the process and significance of revising the interpretation of the right of collective self-defense, and the American side agreed this would be an important step to ensure the effectiveness of the U.S.-Japan alliance. It will be important to complete this work in advance of the review of U.S.-Japan defense guidelines.

    Against this background, U.S.-Japan-ROK security cooperation will be indispensable, and it is urgent that steps be taken to make that possible.

    The participants unanimously agreed on the economic and strategic importance of the Trans-Pacific Partnership (TPP) to U.S. engagement in Asia and the success of the Japanese economy. The discussion also included an examination of energy security issues and the need for a comprehensive energy strategy that includes nuclear and natural gas. Commissioners agreed that increased U.S. natural gas exports to Japan are in both countries' national interests.

    The commission may periodically invite scholars to conduct research that will inform these discussions and may choose to publish occasional papers over the course of this project. The commission agreed to produce an interim report for presentation later this year.





CSIS-SPF Commission:
Roundtable with Commissioners
Video: CSIS-SPF Commission:
Interview with Ambassador Ryozo Kato

Click here for more event materials

January 31, 2014

Abenomics in 2014

Koichi Hamada,
Professor Emeritus, Yale University and the University of Tokyo

December 12, 2013

The Asia Rebalance: Year-End Assessment

James Zumwalt

Deputy Assistant Secretary for East Asian and Pacific Affairs
Bureau of East Asian and Pacific Affairs
Department of State

November 13, 2013

Japan's Relations with the Two Koreas: Current Problems and Future Prospects

Featuring:

Dr. Hajime Izumi

Professor, University of Shizuoka

Dr. Masao Okonogi
Research Professor, Kyushu University

Dr. Junya Nishino
Associate Professor, Keio University

Dr. Kyung-won Choi
Research Fellow, Kyushu University


Moderator:

Daniel Bob
Senior Fellow and Director, U.S.-Japan Programs, SPFUSA

Wednesday, November 13, 2013, 12:00 PM - 2:00 PM
Sasakawa Peace Foundation USA, Suite 300, 1819 L St., N.W., Washington, D.C. 

Japan-ROK relations have entered a particularly difficult period as tensions with North Korea remain and frictions with Beijing have increased. Four noted scholars on Korea and Japan Korea relations discuss the issues at play and make suggestions for improving relations between the two countries.

*images provided by the participants themselves

**we were unable to obtain an image of Dr. Choi

November 6, 2013


Abenomics: From Macroeconomic to Structural Reform
Co-presented by the Sasakawa Peace Foundation USA
and the Peterson Institute for International Economics.

Panelists

  • Adam Posen, PIIE
  •  Junko Chano, Sasakawa Peace Foundation USA
  •  James Fatheree, US-Japan Business
  •  Jerald Schiff, IMF
  •  Takashi Imamura, Marubeni America Corporation
  •  Daniel Bob, Sasakawa Peace Foundation USA
  •  Wendy Cutler, USTR
  •  Yorizumi Watanabe, Keio University
  •  Jeffrey Schott, PIIE
  •  Norihiko Ishiguro, METI

Wednesday, November 6, 2013
9:45 AM-2:00 PM 

Peterson Institute for International Economics
1750 Massachusetts Avenue, NW, Washington, DC

The dramatic changes are under way in Japanese economic policy. Jerald Schiff, deputy director of the Asia-Pacific Department at the International Monetary Fund, and Adam S. Posen, PIIE president, opened with a discussion of how Prime Minister Shinzo Abe can shift from fiscal to structural reform priorities. Acting Deputy US Trade Representative Wendy Cutler, Yorizumi Watanabe of Keio University, and Jeffrey J. Schott of the Peterson Institute, discussed how the Abenomics' trade agenda and Trans-Pacific Partnership (TPP) may advance Japanese productivity. Norihiko Ishiguro, Vice-Minister for International Affairs at Japan's Ministry of Economy, Trade and Industry (METI), delivered a keynote address on the government's agenda.

For more information, click here.

October 2, 2013

 

Japan's Health Changes

Ira Wolf,
Japan Representative, PhRMA

 

* image courtesy of Ira Wolf.

September 26, 2013

 

What's New about Prime Minister Abe's Security Agenda?

Dr. Yoshihide Soeya,
Professor of International Politics and Japanese Diplomacy at Keio University, Director of the Keio Institute of East Asian Studies at Keio University

* image via here.

September 23, 2013

 

A Conversation with Yoriko Kawaguchi

Yoriko Kawaguchi,
Visiting Professor,
Meiji Institute for Global Affairs

 

* image via here.

August 13, 2013

 

Japan's Relations with Southeast Asia

Ashok Kumar Mirpuri,
Ambassador of Singapore

August 9, 2013

 

Japanese Defense Policy: Defense Posture Review Interim Report

Kiyoshi Serizawa,
Director,
Defense Policy Division, Bureau of Defense Policy, Ministry of Defense

June 24, 2013


U.S.-Japan Commission on the Future of the Alliance

The Sasakawa Peace Foundation launched a major new project, "The U.S.-Japan Commission on the Future of the Alliance," on June 24, 2013 in Tokyo. The Commission is composed of two groups, one in Japan led by former Ambassador to the United States Ryozo Kato and one in the United States led by Ambassador Richard Armitage and Dr. John Hamre. The Commission will work over the next three years to develop recommendations to ensure the alliance is ready for the challenges of the twenty first century.

As Ambassador Kato said in introducing the Tokyo discussions, "The U.S.-Japan alliance remains the bulwark for peace and prosperity in the Asia Pacific and will remain so for the foreseeable future." Ambassador Armitage remarked on "the essential nature of the alliance and the need for the two leading democracies in the region to ensure its continued vitality," while Dr. Hamre noted that "the region has undergone momentous change over the last half century, but the U.S.-Japan partnership has never been more critical than now."

In commenting on the Commission, Jiro Hanyu, Chairman of The Sasakawa Peace Foundation, said, "I'm pleased that at the first joint meeting of the Commission in Tokyo, the group was able to cover a great number of issues and lay out a roadmap for the forthcoming work of the Commission. We also issued a consensus document, what we are calling the Commission's Charter, listing our goals and some of the specific topics we will discuss."

The Commission met for one and one-half days of discussion at the Hotel Okura in Tokyo. The American Commissioners also visited Prime Minister Abe to provide him with an overview of the discussions and a copy of the Charter. The next joint meeting of the group will take place in the fall of 2013.

The Charter is provided in full below.

U.S.-Japan Commission on the Future of the Alliance

Charter

June 24, 2013

Tokyo

The Asia Pacific region is the center of dynamism in the international system, and events there are defining the security and prosperity of the world. Increased economic interdependence and a budding institutional architecture are creating a solid foundation for a vibrant and stable future, but the region also faces an array of challenges that could destabilize the security environment. For over six decades the U.S.-Japan alliance has been the cornerstone of security and stability in the Asia Pacific, and it should continue to play an essential role in shaping the regional order.

The U.S. and Japanese governments are taking important steps to strengthen the alliance and ensure that it remains a lynchpin in maintaining regional stability and prosperity. The Sasakawa Peace Foundation and the Center for Strategic and International Studies (CSIS) have established a bilateral commission of distinguished policymakers and scholars to develop a strategic vision for the alliance and articulate its continued importance to the publics of both countries.

The commission convened for the first time today in Tokyo and will meet twice a year over the next three years to discuss the future trajectory of the alliance. Topics will include roles and missions that could enhance the U.S. rebalance to the Asia Pacific, how Japan's exercise of the right of collective self-defense might allow for more effective capabilities and strengthen deterrence, more effective consolidation and joint use of U.S. bases in Japan, strengthening bilateral intelligence cooperation, cyber security, the North Korean nuclear and missile threat, trade liberalization, shaping mutually beneficial relations with China, energy security, networking the alliance with other key partners in the region, other measures to ensure the credibility and effectiveness of the alliance in facing the challenges of the 21st Century, and additional subjects to be determined by the commission. The commission will invite scholars to conduct research that will inform these discussions, and it will facilitate public outreach in both countries.

Commission members are as follows:

Richard Armitage, President, Armitage International, L.C.
Aaron Friedberg, Professor of Politics and International Affairs, Princeton University
Michael Green, Senior Vice President for Asia and Japan Chair, CSIS and Associate Professor, Georgetown University
Jiro Hanyu, Chairman, The Sasakawa Peace Foundation
John Hamre, President, CEO and Pritzker Chair, CSIS
Ryozo Kato, Commissioner, Nippon Professional Baseball and former Ambassador of Japan to the United States
Joseph Nye Jr., University Distinguished Service Professor, John F. Kennedy School of Government, Harvard University
Yukio Okamoto, President, Okamoto Associates
Masashi Nishihara, President, Research Institute for Peace and Security
Koji Tanami, Former Administrative Vice Minister, Ministry of Finance and former President, Japan Bank for International Cooperation



May 9, 2013

 

Territorial Disputes: Lessons from Scarborough Shoal

Hon. Jose L. Cuisia, Jr.,
Ambassador of the Republic of the Philippines

May 1, 2013


Capitol Hill Welcome Reception in Honor of Japanese Leaders

Co-presented by Japan Center for International Exchange, Sasakawa Peace Foundation USA, U.S.-Japan Council, Japan-United States Friendship Commission, U.S. Association of Former Members of Congress, US CULCON, U.S.-Japan-South Korea Legislative Exchange Program at George Washington University, U.S.-Japan Research Institute.

Distinguished Guests:
Dr. Gerald Curtis, Professor of Political Science, Columbia University
Hon. Norman Mineta, Vice Chairman, Hill & Knowlton; former US Secretary of Transportation
Hon. Takeo Kawamura, Member, House of Representatives; former Chief Cabinet Secretary
Hon. Kenichiro Sasae, Ambassador Extraordinary and Plenipotentiary, Embassy of Japan in the United States

Wednesday, May 1, 2013

Images courtesy of Japan Center for International Exchange.

More information can be found here.

February 15, 2013


The Economics of Abenomics: A Pre-Summit Assessment

Co-presented by the Sasakawa Peace Foundation USA and the Peterson Institute for International Economics.

Panelists:
Adam Posen, PIIE
Junko Chano, Sasakawa Peace Foundation USA
Marcus Noland, PIIE
Koichi Hamada, Yale University
Stephan Danninger, IMF
Daniel Bob, Sasakawa Peace Foundation USA
Motoshige Itoh, The University of Tokyo
Clayton Yeutter, PIIE

Friday, February 15, 2013
9:00 AM-12:00 PM
Peterson Institute for International Economics
1750 Massachusetts Avenue, NW, Washington, DC

Japan's new Prime Minister, Shinzo Abe, has made the country's economic revival his top priority and has already begun implementing a mix of monetary, fiscal and economic growth strategies toward that end. Among other measures, the Bank of Japan recently set an inflation target of 2 percent and the Prime Minister announced aY13.1 trillion supplemental budget. Speakers including Professor Koichi Hamada, the main architect of Abenomics and Professor Motoshige Itoh, a member of the Prime Minister's Council on Economic and Fiscal Policy, will outline the principles of Abenomics and assess the strategy's likely impacts on economic growth, exchange rates, the country's trade policies and structural reform.

For more information, click here.

 

March 5, 2013

SASAKAWA PEACE FOUNDATION USA TO PARTNER WITH THE CONGRESSIONAL STUDY GROUP ON JAPAN

Expands Program Dedicated to Bilateral Legislative Dialogue in 20th Anniversary Year

The Sasakawa Peace Foundation USA (SPFUSA) is pleased to announce a new partnership with The Congressional Study Group on Japan (CSGJ), with a grant to the Study Group in support of its commitment to programming on legislative dialogue and U.S.-Japan relations.

"We are pleased to partner with the Study Group, the premier organization dedicated to enhancing understanding of Japan-U.S. relations within Congress," said Junko Chano, President of SPFUSA. As President Obama mentioned last week, 'the U.S.-Japan alliance is the central foundation for our regional security and so much of what we do in the Pacific region.' The Study Group's role in enhancing the alliance and broader bilateral relations is vitally important, and SPFUSA looks forward to a successful and productive collaboration."

"As The Congressional Study Group on Japan celebrates its 20th anniversary, we are honored to have the support of the Sasakawa Peace Foundation USA," said Ambassador (ret.) Connie Morella. "Our similar values and missions make our two programs a natural fit for collaboration and synergy," she added. Morella is the President of the U.S. Association of Former Members of Congress, which administers The Congressional Study Group on Japan, along with the Study Groups on Germany, Turkey, and Europe.

This partnership will contribute significantly to the expansion of CSGJ program activities, the cornerstone of which is a regular series of roundtables on Capitol Hill for Members of Congress and senior congressional staff with visiting delegations from the Japanese Diet and high-level experts from the administration, academia, business leaders, and the diplomatic community.

The 86-member Congressional Study Group on Japan is led by Rep. Shelley Moore Capito (R-WV) and Rep. Jim McDermott (D-WA) in the House, and Sen. Mazie Hirono (D-HI) and Sen. Lisa Murkowski (R-AK) in the Senate. Speaker Tom Foley (D-WA, 1965-1995) and Speaker Dennis Hastert (R-IL, 1987-2007) also remain active as Honorary Co-Chairs. Programming is also supported by funding from the Japan-U.S. Friendship Commission and the organizations that make up the Study Group's Business Advisory Council.

April 26, 2013

Update on Japan's Participation in TPP

Wendy Cutler,
Assistant U.S. Trade Representative for Japan, Korea and APEC Affairs,
Office of United States Trade Representative

 

 

 

 

March 22, 2013

TPP: A View from the U.S. Auto Industry

Stephen E. Biegun,
Vice President,
International Governmental Affairs Ford Motor Company

 

February 28, 2013

The Economic Condition in Japan:
Business Sentiments and Real Financial Positions

Dr. Cindy Yoshiko Shirata,
Professor of International Business,
Graduate School of Business Sciences, Tsukuba University,
Tokyo, Japan

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